PowerShell Reminders now in Beta

For awhile now I’ve been working on a PowerShell project that I use every day. I am always in a PowerShell prompt and because I always seem to have little things like phone calls or family events that I need to keep track of, I wrote a “tickler” system. The events are stored in a SQL database any my PowerShell commands query for upcoming events. My module has commands for setting up the database, querying commands and modifying data. All the SQL stuff is done without using the SQL PowerShell module because I didn’t want to take a dependency on it and I want to write something that will work cross-platform.  I wasn’t sure if the SQL cmdlets would be 100% compatible, plus my needs were simple so I found it easier to write my own query function. Today, I decided to launch a semi-public beta and share it with you.

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PowerShell Pop Quiz

I’m always looking for ways to help teach PowerShell and the other day I thought why not have PowerShell teach you itself? I have created a PowerShell script that dynamically generates a quiz on cmdlets and functions installed on your computer. In short the quiz question shows you a command synopsis and then presents a menu of possible answers. You select the answer. Given the verb-noun pattern of command names this *should* be easy, but you might be surprised.

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Get Git with PowerShell

If you are creating PowerShell scripts, tools or modules today, you are most likely using Git. What? You’re not? Is it because you haven’t gotten around to installing it? I have some “quick and dirty” PowerShell hacks to help you out on Windows systems. Linux boys and girls already know what to do.

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Enhancing PSVersionTable

Not too long ago I posted a PowerShell function that could provide detail abut the PowerShell engine driving your current PowerShell session. I like having a function that writes an object to the pipeline, can take parameters and offer help documentation. But there’s an alternative approach you could also take.

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Throwing the Kitchen Sink at PowerShell

The other day I was watching a good intro video from Shane Young on getting started with PowerShell profiles. I use profile scripts extensively, and they can be extremely useful in configuring your PowerShell experience. One element you could add to your profile is a customized PowerShell prompt. Microsoft provides one by default. It creates a simple function called prompt. The best part is that you can define your own function called prompt, and PowerShell will run it every time you hit enter.

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