Who is Running Your PowerShell Script?

I’ve often talked about the benefit of including Verbose output in your PowerShell scripts and functions from the very beginning. This is especially helpful when someone else is running your command but encounters a problem. You can have them start a transcript, run your command with –Verbose, close the transcript and send it to you. if you’ve written informative Verbose messaging you should be able to figure out the problem. Part of the information might include metadata about the person running the command and their environment. To simply things, I’ve created an easy to use function called Get-PSWho.

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A PowerShell Module for your Type Extensions

If you’ve been following this blog recently, you’ve read about my fun with PowerShell type extensions. This technique lets you make PowerShell give you the information you want without a lot of work on your part. Well, there is some work but you only have to do it once. To make it even easier, I have been working on a module to simplify this even further. The module is still in beta so I’m hoping some of you will kick it around before I publish it to the PowerShell Gallery.

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Extending PowerShell with Custom Property Sets

If you’ve been following along on the blog recently you’ve read about my use of PowerShell type extensions. This is a way of adding new properties to things I use all the time. The goal is to save typing and get what I need with minimal effort. You can also take this a step further by creating your own property sets.

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Extending Hyper-V with PowerShell

Lately I’ve been writing about my use of PowerShell type extensions as a way to get more done quickly. Or at least give me the information I want with minimal effort. I use Hyper-V a great deal and the Hyper-V cmdlets are invaluable. And while a command like Get-VM provides a lot of information, I always seem to want more so I thought I’d share with you my Hyper-V related type extensions. Even if you don’t need or use Hyper-V, you might find my techniques useful.

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Sending Files to Your Browser with PowerShell

Over the course of the last year I’ve been using markdown files much more, especially as part of the Platyps module. Even though I have a markdown editor and I can also preview files in VS Code, sometimes I want to see the file in my browser which has a markdown viewer plugin. Or I might want to see something else in my browser. I had been pasting the file path and pasting it into the browser, but of course realized I should get smart about this and write a PowerShell function to make this easier. Thus was born Out-Browser. Although it proved a bit trickier than I expected because the registry was involved.

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