Creating a Github Gist with PowerShell

Recently I posted a PowerShell tool for creating a GitHub repository. In continuing my exploration of the GitHub API I wrote another PowerShell tool to create a GitHub gist. A gist is simple way to store and share snippets or code samples. I use them to share simple PowerShell scripts or other works that aren’t full blown multi-file modules. Now I can create these gists directly from PowerShell and the PowerShell ISE.

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Creating a GitHub Repository from PowerShell

I’ve been continuing to work with the GitHub API in PowerShell. Today I have a function you can use to create a new GitHub repository. Of course you will need to have a GitHub account and another piece of critical information, but after that it is quite easy to create new repositories. This makes it easier for you to automate provisioning new projects, which is something else I’m working on. But for now, let’s create some repos!

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PowerShell 6.0 Release Tools

As you should be aware, the next version of PowerShell is open source and cross-platform. You will be able to run PowerShell v6 on Windows, a Mac and select Linux distributions. All of the code is currently in alpha and hosted on the PowerShell GitHub repository. This is also where you can download new builds to install and test. I’ll admit I’m a little behind the curve and part of that is because I don’t often check if there is a new release. So I built a PowerShell module that will do that for me, and even download new installation packages. The best part, is that this should work cross-platform.

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Friday Fun: Timing is Everything

For today’s fun I want to introduce you to a PowerShell project I’ve been working on. As with many of these Friday Fun projects this is something that is hardly groundbreaking but it could be fun to use and hopefully serves an educational purpose.  What I have is a module called MyTimer that contains several commands designed to work with a very simple timer. In fact it is so simple you’ll probably think I’m joking.

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Memory Reporting with PowerShell

I’ve started a new project and I’m hoping a few of you will give it a spin and let me know how it works for you. I’ve created a PowerShell module called MemoryTools that uses a few WMI classes and performance counters to provide insight into memory utilization and configuration on your servers. The module has several commands including one that skips the pipeline (exception to the rule!) and uses Write-Host to display memory status in living color.

show-memoryusage

The project is up on GitHub at https://github.com/jdhitsolutions/MemoryTools if you’d like to give it a try. The Readme file should give you a overview of what to expect. Use GitHub to report any bugs or feature requests. I know I still need to add command help.

The module should work on any computer running v3 or later. Note that the Get-PhysicalMemory command, which queries the Win32_PhysicalMemory class, may not show results for some properties. There are a few new class properties that require Windows Server 2016 but I decided to include them anyway.

I look forward to hearing about your experiences.